Reach friends with digital media and blogs

Leverage Your Real Social Network for Content Marketing

“Tell me again what it is you do.”

Ever heard that upon meeting someone for the first or second time? Or maybe after being acquaintances or neighbors for years?

How can a blog help you reach your target market through people you already know?

A client decided their company should start doing regular blogs and while it requires extra effort among the staff who contribute, the website manager has seen an uptick in traffic from the blogs.

And how did we get those blogs out to people? Social media. One of the authors related that after he shared his company blog to his hundreds of Facebook friends (by sharing the company’s Facebook page link to the blog), a high school buddy reached out to say I didn’t realize your company does such-and-such and I need that service.

Voila: new customer. You see where I am going with this?

We often think of content marketing as sending pings out to the universe with blogs and social media, but your signals can reach people you already know who don’t know what you do. Or they forgot. Or they will relate your information to someone else who can use it.

picking blog topics

OK, so now what do you write? Think about problems you solve for your customers. Frame your services in terms of what value it provides.

Write a list of things your company does. What is unique? What is a commodity? Start crafting that story. Work from your elevator pitch. Oh wait, does your elevator pitch need some work too?

Good. This is where you need to exert some discipline. Look at your current revenue streams. Decide which to emphasize. Look at what current laggard you may want to highlight.

Now, from your list of priorities, winnow down four categories. There you go: your first four weeks of blogs. Assign them or do them yourself.

To organize your thoughts before writing, opt for about three points to make and structure your blog accordingly. After you think it is done, put it aside to return to it later. Then, perform a dramatic reading. You should find yourself making revisions. Get other people to edit it!

Which social media?

Some people in your audience use Twitter as a news feed and look at it repeatedly during the day. Other people respond well to email marketing. Pick about three venues, but no more than five to reach out with content marketing. Anything more and you’ll spread yourself thin.

What is the most important thing you can do? Start blogging.

Hands working a craft.

The Craft of Writing Content and Copy

 

When you visualize someone honing a craft, images of woodworkers or potters might come to mind. Writing too is a craft.

Old school news writers refer to their craft because good writing is a product that comes from forethought and practice. Writers learn their craft from more experienced writers, much like old time apprentices.

When it comes to social media marketing and digital content writing, I’m taking this analogy a step further and comparing these services to craft beer. Microbrewing harkens back to the old days when neighborhood bars sold locally produced beer. Of late, big corporate, multi-national brewing companies have rolled out brands that emulate local craft beers. They have cute labels and names, and their recipes differ from the flagship brand. In addition, some craft beer companies have been acquired by big brewers.

But craft beer purists will content this is beer blasphemy. It comes down, though, to consumer choice. Some people love basic big brewery beer and the price. Craft beer aficionados, by contrast, are willing to pay a bit more for a higher quality product with unique recipes and flavors. What does this have to do with social media?

Perhaps you’ve heard of white label social media. This is like buying beer brewed according to a single recipe that tastes the same in every outlet. It’s uniform. It may not be what you like. It might be perfectly serviceable, but perhaps not specific to your needs or desires.

Or, you could go to the local craft brewery and find they make, in small batches, highly specialized and sophisticated beers aimed at the palates and tastes of discerning customers. Likewise, hiring a local digital marketing company means the writer will craft your business storytelling to suit your local target audience. Something generic that works in another market or for a similar business will not meet your specific needs.

To learn more about the craft honed by Adroit Narratives, check out Katharine Fraser’s bio.

 

Emoticons crying over digital marketing

Digital Marketing Cries Out for Coordination

Let’s be honest: sometimes digital marketing can just seem like too much: Vimeo or YouTube, to tweet or not to tweet, fork over a Facebook ad spend or try Pinterest.

Personally, I’m not a fan of Google+ and think a lot of platforms (Google and Facebook) should roll out better user experience tools. Ever wasted time looking for something simple? Yep. Would you rather just not have to deal with the mechanics of it?

Moreover, do you have a consistent marketing message? How are you coordinating that? Would you like it to be systematically managed?

The first thing you want to do is scope out what you are already doing. You may have to literally write this out on a white board or piece of paper. Take your time. Go through your passwords lists to see what you had signed up for historically. You do track this stuff, right? OK, ask your staff to tell you what they may have been doing in social media and other areas. You need to box this in before you can assess what has worked and what hasn’t worked.

For the latter category, be fair about whether something worked. If you tried something sporadically, don’t place unfair expectations on it. Or, maybe you tried something with a vendor that wasn’t a good fit for you.

Now, before asking yourself what will work, ask this: who am I trying to reach and what I am seeking to accomplish over what period of time. For example, how many leads do you need to secure how much new business over the next six months? Do not seriously ask what you can accomplish in a month with digital marketing. That is not a serious question.

Next, who is going to devise the marketing message and manage it? How will they coordinate input from key stakeholders and participants (sales people, service people, customers and business owners)?

What is the best process or operating procedure for ensuring this gets done? Talk to your marketing coordinator about what is realistic and what would be optimal to get your digital marketing organized.

For more information , contact communications and marketing consultant Katharine Fraser.

Adroit Narratives logo with daily miracle imagery.

The Daily Miracle of Content Creation

How do you decide what to write every day when it comes to video scripts, blogs and social media posts for your business’s digital marketing?

Perhaps you’ve created an “editorial calendar” and pegged its topics to your seasonal offerings or otherwise organized a list of topics to systematically cover in this content marketing. Great! Plus, you probably know you ought to stay consistent and push out this original material on a regular basis.

Now, if you are lucky, determined and resourceful, you have created time in the schedule to do this. Or rather, imagine you floated to work on a cloud and miraculously have time to write a bunch of social media posts and blogs. Now what?

Do you have writer’s block? Is a cursor blinking on your screen, calling out begging for copy and tormenting you with its relentless blinking? Perhaps you do not like this.

Did you know there is an entire segment of the population who likes writing. Many of them, by dint of education and formal training, have actually become quite adept at this writing thing.

The Daily Miracle

Many of these writers are veterans of the Daily Miracle, an age-old ritual commonly known as news writing. When I first got out of journalism school, I wrote for a weekly business newspaper, which meant you had some time to craft your story. The bummer was that anyone writing for a daily newspaper could easily scoop your weekly news outlet. (To supply some context, I’m old enough to remember the Stone Age before news was available online. During this period, the Internet was primarily used by academics and such, and not commercial enterprises, newspapers and certainly not common peons or ink-stained wretches.)

When I moved to a daily financial services paper, I became subject to the overlords of the Daily Miracle, who required me to file my stories every weekday at 2:30 p.m. Eastern. This was especially fun the month I spent reporting from San Francisco on New York time. Yes, I had to submit my copy by 11:30 a.m. Pacific time. This was more than 20 years ago, yet I still think of 2:30 p.m. as a major demarcation in a workday.Adroit Narratives logo with daily miracle imagery.

As a young writer, I often felt stressed out by the 2:30 p.m. deadline and, moreover, by the requirement that I have a good story to write about every work day. Sometimes the morning commute served as a big brainstorm when I thought of everyone I would call to find a story. Usually, I had written a lot of my story by lunchtime. Meeting the big deadline become more and more doable.

Nowadays, I still write the daily miracle, mostly for clients’ digital marketing campaigns. When it comes to ensuring I keep up with my own blogs, I can feel like a plumber with a leaky faucet in my own home. When I must write, I just shut out everything else, reflect and start typing.

Be sure that you create a grand plan for content marketing and then devise ways to create achievable every day action items to make it happen.

For more information on content marketing, contact consultant Katharine Fraser.

grammar

Why Good Writing Still Matters in the Digital Age

Digital content marketing displays for all to see what is good writing and what is plain terrible. To promote your business, which would you prefer?

There is even a trend of purposefully poor writing that is meant to be cute. This may have started when people needed to introduce the meaning of their memes. For example, they post to social media an image of a forlorn animal flopping on the ground or some such with the caption: My Monday Be Like. Or maybe, When You Start Mondaying. Whether you find these memes cute or annoying in your personal Facebook feed, ask yourself whether it is good for business. Depends on the business, right?

If you run a gym and want to encourage people to work out with you, a silly post about being tired but able to Zumba would be cute. If you are selling in the B2B arena, avoid memes. Really. Please don’t use memes in B2B. You are not living in an episode of “The Office.”

This casual, broken grammar vernacular is entering speech patterns and even being used on purpose in television ads.

ACCIDENTAL LANGUAGE DESTRUCTION

Separately, we’re all seeing language destruction in news articles, even those published by historically well-regarded newspaper companies. I recently saw a post to Facebook by the Washington Post that was grammatically incoherent and the commenters shredded the institution for this lapse. Having worked in news as a reporter and editor, I can attest that everyone makes mistakes.grammar

But, what we are seeing now in terms of mistakes is their prevalence rather than an anomaly. For example, today I read this phrase in a news story – “She has since changed coarse…” – and wondered if the writer and/or editor would even realize the mistake. In my estimation, this is occurring as news staffs at many organizations have shrunk due to budgetary considerations.

ABBREVIATIONS, ACRONYMS and OH NOs

Twitter’s 140-character limit seems to drive people into a fear of writing too long, so they write too short with weird little abbreviations. If you have to rely on the device of stringing together sets of capital letters, I suggest you try rephrasing that sentiment. Some acronyms and abbreviations are very well known, with many going back to the days of the telegraph, but try to avoid using more than two in a Tweet.

Finally, here’s an abbreviation often seen in Twitter that really needs to go:

“Please RT!”

Cheers,

Katharine Fraser, consultant, content creator and owner of Adroit Narratives, LLC

love writing

On Good Writing and How to Get It

When I tell people I am a writer, I tend to get two reactions:

“Oh, I could never write well.”

“Do you like it?”

For the latter, consider whether I would work as a professional writer for more than 20 years if I disliked it. As for the former proposition, the only way to become is a good writer is to do a lot of writing.

You also must be willing to take and incorporate critiques. In college, my two majors happened to require contrasting writing styles. In journalism, you start a story by telling the reader the upshot or outcome. For history, by contrast, you start at the beginning and build a case toward a conclusion. One day, my history advisor stopped me on campus to tell me that my writing had become “weird.” That was to say I opened a history paper with a news lede.

At my first newspaper job, I was blessed with strong editors who gently guided me away from writing too much or writing in a manner too fancy to get the job done. With good writing, there is no need to gild the lily. You just say it straight. Get to the point. Yet so much of what we read online buries the lede. For example, how many recipe blogs start out with hundreds and hundreds of words before mentioning the recipe’s ingredients and directions? To be fair, I publish a lifestyle blog that narrates my cooking adventures, but they are rarely more than 500 words and the instructions are higher up in the copy. By contrast, I have found myself scrolling and scrolling and scrolling down a recipe post before finding the recipe.

Now, to be sure, there is some SEO method to this madness, but let’s not get totally carried away by padding blogs with search terms. I also suspect that people who write meandering musings in their blog never had a tough, wise-cracking news editor bearing down on their copy. Remember, the whole point of writing something is to engage the reader. What is the use of bringing someone to your blog if you are boring?

You have just a moment to grab their attention, which is the objective of a news headline. That’s akin to a great Tweet or the opening of a social media post. In news writing, people ask themselves – before hitting the keystrokes – what is my lede? (Lede is old-time news spelling for lead sentence.) In other words, what is the most important, new thing you need to convey to the reader? For marketing a product or service, you should give the reader information they just may not have been aware of; this educational material shows you know your stuff and gives the audience a reason to know who you are.

Say you own a jewelry store. Running a social media post about the cheapest diamonds in town is going to send the wrong message. What if instead you crafted a post about an electric toothbrush being a diamond’s best friend? That made you curious, right? Turns out, some jewelers recommend using a electric toothbrush to polish your diamond. Just don’t use the same brushhead you put in your mouth. My point is social media is supposed to be fun and you can use elements of humor and surprise to be quirky in marketing. Still, don’t go crazy. If you are a small business and doing your own marketing, be sure to go to trusted friends as sounding boards and test out any wacky ideas.

The beauty of social media, though, is it more often rewards experiments than it punishes mistakes. Your experiment would have to be really, really awful to hurt much. I like to try different art or animations for the images. I play with video editing and photo editing on design platforms. As a result, I can stay fresh with content presentation.

The writing can be playful too. As for regular day-to-day writing for your newsletters and social media, have a coworker read it first. At the very least, they can clean up the copy to free it of typos, which can hurt your credibility. Finally, one piece of biased advice: do not publish yourself unless you are an experienced professional editor.

Cheers,

Katharine Fraser, Adroit Narratives