Reach friends with digital media and blogs

Leverage Your Real Social Network for Content Marketing

“Tell me again what it is you do.”

Ever heard that upon meeting someone for the first or second time? Or maybe after being acquaintances or neighbors for years?

How can a blog help you reach your target market through people you already know?

A client decided their company should start doing regular blogs and while it requires extra effort among the staff who contribute, the website manager has seen an uptick in traffic from the blogs.

And how did we get those blogs out to people? Social media. One of the authors related that after he shared his company blog to his hundreds of Facebook friends (by sharing the company’s Facebook page link to the blog), a high school buddy reached out to say I didn’t realize your company does such-and-such and I need that service.

Voila: new customer. You see where I am going with this?

We often think of content marketing as sending pings out to the universe with blogs and social media, but your signals can reach people you already know who don’t know what you do. Or they forgot. Or they will relate your information to someone else who can use it.

picking blog topics

OK, so now what do you write? Think about problems you solve for your customers. Frame your services in terms of what value it provides.

Write a list of things your company does. What is unique? What is a commodity? Start crafting that story. Work from your elevator pitch. Oh wait, does your elevator pitch need some work too?

Good. This is where you need to exert some discipline. Look at your current revenue streams. Decide which to emphasize. Look at what current laggard you may want to highlight.

Now, from your list of priorities, winnow down four categories. There you go: your first four weeks of blogs. Assign them or do them yourself.

To organize your thoughts before writing, opt for about three points to make and structure your blog accordingly. After you think it is done, put it aside to return to it later. Then, perform a dramatic reading. You should find yourself making revisions. Get other people to edit it!

Which social media?

Some people in your audience use Twitter as a news feed and look at it repeatedly during the day. Other people respond well to email marketing. Pick about three venues, but no more than five to reach out with content marketing. Anything more and you’ll spread yourself thin.

What is the most important thing you can do? Start blogging.

How to Write a Blog for Your Business

Where do you start when sitting down to write a blog to market your business? Overcome whatever inertia is holding you back. You may only need a half hour to an hour to do this. You also need not be the greatest writer in the world – you just need to be good at writing.

In this blog, I will walk you through three basic steps to writing a blog.

  • Pick a topic and break it down into a series of related blogs
  • Aim to write about 500 words per blog
  • Edit yourself!

Blogging a Marketing Campaign

You have a lot to say; you built a better mousetrap and want the world to beat a path to your door. But, it’s complicated. Your business model is complex and your product’s value proposition is hard to explain in short order. This is why it is OK to give away some basic information for free. You are not giving away the farm, but instead getting people interested. Now, they view you as a resource and if you are good at what you do, they are more likely to buy. Speak from experience, use real-life examples to tell a story and paint the picture of what your product or service will do for them.

By stringing out a series of blogs under an umbrella topic you can showcase your product or service more in-depth. If you were selling mousetraps, you could first blog about why a breakthrough has been long overdue and highlight the simplest reason your product provides that. The next blog could be a quick history of how your product was developed and who is behind it. The third blog could be a customer experience story (how your product solved a problem for a customer). The fourth blog could overtly pitch the better mousetrap.

By mapping out a structure for yourself, you can easily write with purpose. Keep your audience in mind and write as it you are answering their questions:

  • What is this about?
  • Why do I care?
  • Why should I trust you?
  • Is this of value?

Always keep the writing fairly simple. You are not writing the Great American Novel. Speak as if your prospect is sitting across from you. The tone should be straightforward. Try not to get to casual or comedic; it’s still business.

Organizing Each Blog with Purpose

Create a roadmap or outline before you begin typing. I believe in the power of threes and usually set out a bulleted list of the three most important things I wish to convey. I developed this habit when I was a news reporter. I would come in fresh from an assignment and feel slightly overwhelmed by everything I gathered. My mind was awash with ideas. To get started, I would jot down the three most important aspects of the story. Then, I would ask myself, what is the lede (lede is news speak for lead sentence) that will hook the reader? It does not have to be sensational, but it needs to be interesting. Some ledes write themselves while others take some thought. Once you write that introduction and fill out the three sections, you will be amazed at how quickly you have written close to 500 words. Maybe you even ran over that amount.

Proofreading is Essential

To start editing yourself, take advantage of the tools in the program you are using. For instance, in Word, the tools menu includes word count. The red, squiggly underline will point out spelling errors. To catch other boo-boos, read your content from the bottom up. Print out the page and proofread the copy with fresh eyes and a pen to scratch out what’s wrong. Walk away for a few minutes and return with a critical eye. If you think it will help you, read it out loud. We often catch our own mistakes with a dramatic reading.

Pop question: did I follow my own advice with the structure and tone of this blog? Let me know what you think. Contact consultant Katharine Fraser.