Doorbells, Drip Campaigns and Delivering Value

If you live with dogs, you undoubtedly are frequently jarred by doorbells in television commercials. I’m going to name names: thank you, Walmart and Stouffer’s, who insist on multiple doorbell sound effects in their ads. No doubt the creators of these ads know that dogs will go bonkers each time they hear them and, ergo, dog owners will remember the ads.

But that certainly backfires when your target audience finds your ads incredibly annoying. I have other choices and do not need to go to Walmart, and I certainly wouldn’t serve guests frozen lasagna.

Analogously, are there certain retailers who send you multiple emails each week? If it is for the same offer, this practice is called a drip campaign. If the campaign is promoting a sale from a store I like, such as Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft, then yes, I rather like the email reminders. But, if the email is from an entity I find mildly interesting, then I really do not need two to three emails per day.

Who wants to be touched by digital marketing that often? Some email marketers seem more aligned with robocallers in practice than storytellers. What are you trying to tell your prospects and customers? Too many drips can feel like Chinese water torture for the email recipient.

Also, too much frequency can suggest desperation. Better to go with one to three emails a week, not several per day (you know you have seen that in your inbox).

And only talking about products and offers can get boring. What value are you bringing to people?

For example, if you are selling clothes, your newsletter could include an article about how to dress up or down with key pieces. And, sure, include sidebars with special offers as well as high-end items.

If you’re selling a professional service, include articles that are useful to your target audience. These are articles should be written by your company and posted to your website. The articles should describe how you solve a particular problem. You can illustrate your expertise without giving away the farm.

With storytelling you are inviting prospects to learn something of value from you. Think of it this way: if you ring someone’s doorbell in real life, they would appreciate if you are bringing something of value. (I’m waiting on the UPS truck as I type).

This is why guests bring hostess gifts to parties. You wouldn’t show up, ring the doorbell repeatedly and then try to sell your wares. So, why would you do that with email marketing? The Pavlovian response you are likely triggering is getting people to click delete, or worse, unsubscribe.

Instead, relate something positive and inviting. Did you hire someone new who is a standout in the field? Share that. Do you have an insight about some current event or controversy? Share that. Can you open with an anecdote about yourself in your business? Share that too. Let your customers and prospects get to know you and appreciate you.

Katharine Fraser is a communications consultant, social media marketer and freelance writer and editor.

One thought on “Doorbells, Drip Campaigns and Delivering Value

Comments are closed.