trading floor

Who Is Listening to Your Brand and How Good Writing Makes It Happen

Ever enjoyed an awkward moment in a meeting? Years ago, I was a young financial writer interviewing a guy who had gone from peddling beer to selling securities and found myself being yelled at by him behind a closed door just off a trading floor.

We sat on chairs facing each other, exposed without a desk or table. I fidgeted my skirt to ensure modesty. The air between us felt thick with tension and my eyes were fixed on my notebook as I tried to keep up with his rapid-fire comments. “Look at me when I am talking to you!,” he bellowed. The criticism was so sharp, I didn’t pause to come up with a polite response. I went Jersey on him. “What, would you prefer I not take good notes and misquote you?” Yes, I had a recorder (pre-smartphone age), but note-taking makes for a better use of time when writing for a daily newspaper.

He fell at ease, if only for a moment. He realized I was not an adversary. I wasn’t there to be his best friend either, but I wasn’t out to get him. Just then, there was shrieking coming from the trading floor by a man who evidently had messed up a client trade and was issuing a mea culpa. He couldn’t take back the error and no one could resolve it for him, so he opted for a form of primal screaming. My interview subject stood up and strode to the door. As he opened it, the shrieking man happened to be right there and immediately became stunned to be inches from the boss’s face. The boss man quietly seethed that the employee should cease all verbal emanation. This was quite effectively expressed with pithy, graphic language.

While I was amused, I wasn’t sure how to get all that into my story. After all, it’s not like I would be able to get confirmation as to how exactly the trader messed up and what was the underlying deal. And, I wasn’t sure I wanted to immediately alienate my new subject. Besides, haven’t we all had one of those days? At least, I witnessed instant karma: you snap at me, and then you look like you’re running a circus instead of a business.

Why do I tell you this story? Well, if you got this far, then you liked the writing. Moreover, I wanted to illustrate the importance of attention to detail. A writing professional is assiduous with note-taking, whether the act of writing or observing. A writer shows you rather than tells you what is happening. Now, ask yourself, how is the story of your business being told. Your marketing narratives needs memorable details. Is your marketing staff or agency listening and observing what is happening with your business and market? Does the marketing, in turn, reflect your core competencies and speak to your target market?

Good storytelling is a craft. It takes experience. And, in the digital realm, it requires strong writing skills. If you want Adroit Narratives to take care of your writing and editing, contact Katharine for information on hourly rates and monthly packages.